Posts Tagged binge eating

“A Binge Is A Binge….”

untitled.png emotinal eatingThere is a wide spectrum of unhealthy eating among women. Removing most of the cheese from a slice of pizza is not quite the same thing as purging the entire contents of your stomach after a meal, but the two behaviors may be related.

Going on a very low calorie diet for a month to “look decent” in last year’s bathing suit is not the same thing as developing a total aversion to food, but they can also be related. Some women consider having an order of French fries with their lunch a binge and others may binge by consuming an unimaginable large quantity of sweets throughout one evening. The truth is a  “binge” is a binge.

Compulsive, obsessive and addictive eating behaviors are all symptoms of something that needs our attention and needs to heal. Besides compromising our health and well-being to lesser and greater degrees, we still put ourselves at risk with routinely unhealthy eating patterns. It is important to find out what the real problem is and be open to appropriate medical and psychological interventions when needed.

The issues we face in feeding ourselves can be giant clues about what we need to learn in our lives. They are to be explored, not avoided. Resolving issues we think are weight-related can help us to be emotionally and spiritually fit enough to live deliberately joyful lives.

 

Dilemma: Distraction or Decision?

imagesFYQPDYOBIt is nine o’clock on a Friday night. You’ve just come home from having a great dinner with friends from work.  After a long and intense week of pouring your highly developed talents into finalizing a critical project, all you want to do is crawl into bed and watch a movie on TV. In the bed with you are some chips and leftover guacamole, bean and cheese dip. On your night table, a can of soda and a handful of grapes wait. More food wasn’t in your plan or was it?

You decide to turn off the television (great decision) and right away, all the resentment you ignored this week while scrambling to meet your boss’s demands settles in your throat. The unforgiving belief that nothing you do is ever good enough takes hold as the aching for recognition pulses in your stomach. The satisfying dinner and the food within your reach notwithstanding, your hunger from a tremendous sense of lack has followed you home.

When we are heart-hungry, heartsick or heartbroken, it is not our body that needs nourishment. We have the choice of distracting ourselves from our pain with food or making the decision to love ourselves. Self-compassion is the antidote for merciless self-judgment; it stops us from relentlessly finding fault and beating ourselves up. A little bit of compassion for ourselves is a bridge to our spirit when we fail, feel isolated in our imperfections and are about to give up on ourselves.

Our relationship with food is complicated.  It can become entwined with important emotional and spiritual issues and the direction our lives are taking. It is important to examine if we are comforting or numbing ourselves with how and what we eat. Taking a closer look at our unhealthy eating patterns can help us see if we are using food in ways that starve our spirit or help it thrive. What Part of You Is hungry?

 

 

What Overeating Is Telling Us

images.jpg XBeing more generous with ourselves lays the framework for maintaining a healthy weight as much as making healthier food choices does. Too often, overeating is the other side of the scarcity we impose upon ourselves. Do we often eat uncomfortably large quantities of food because we allow ourselves too little affection? Do we work very hard and make a lot of money but never spend much on ourselves?

If our relationship with food is wounded, we can be sure that woundedness spills over into other areas of our lives. Many of us find it easier to feel guilty than to forgive ourselves. Many others say more than “thank you” when someone gives them a compliment. Our relationship with food mirrors the relationship we have with ourselves.
Chaotic eating patterns often reflect other internal storms. If you’re eating is chaotic, in what other areas of your life is there disorder and confusion? What situations are causing you unhappiness and undue stress? Has an important relationship become unreliable, causing you conflict or grief? Where can you identify instability or growing concerns at home or at work?

The next time you overeat, instead of feeling guilty come up with a thoughtful and reassuring response to help you move on with a little more grace and a lot more self respect. What might that be?