Posts Tagged healthy weight maintenence

INVITATION TO HEAL

dreamstime_m_34879771Food, in its broadest sense heals. Our hunger is an invitation to healing. Our thoughts and feelings about our foods, our hungers and how we feed ourselves reflect a great deal about our identity as women. Our behavior around food says something about how well we love ourselves, how we relate to others and what we do with our lives. It’s that important.

For some of us, decisions about food and eating are so layered and complicated that they become a source of on-going tension that never lets up. We become so caught up in the daily struggle that we don’t fully grasp that our lives don’t have to be this way. Before we know it, tomorrow is already upon us and the struggle begins again. A different paradigm for thinking about food can free you from thoughts about being or becoming fat, and all the other related issues that have taken a stranglehold on your life. What Part of You Is Hungry?

Unhealthy attitudes about our bodies and how we feed them prevail. Some of us use food as a buffer between layers of pain and heartbreak, exhausting our will. Too many of us starve, no matter how much we eat. Every woman should take a close look at her relationship with food because it is perhaps the most intimate barometer of self-worth and how we live our lives. As we heal our relationship with food, we heal our relationship with ourselves and come as close to living “happily ever after” as we can get.

The Meaning of Food: An Overview

Happy-Group-of-WomenDon’t you wish you could go back in time and ask Eve why she ate that apple? She was surrounded by lush beauty and all the food she could ever want or need. What was she not getting from living in Paradise? What wasn’t she getting from Adam? What couldn’t she provide for herself?

The whole spectrum of problems that you have with eating may be more about the nature of your hunger than about the food you consume. Some essential part of you besides your body is starving. Some need is not being met. Some potential is not being realized. Perhaps something painful is crowding out some of the joy and purpose in your life. Food, in its broadest sense, is what heals you. Food redeems your understanding of yourself.

How you feed yourself involves far more than the choices you make every day about the substances you put into your body. Certainly you need energy to carry out your thoughts, purposeful acts and support the structure and functioning of your incredible human body. Most likely you understand food to be the organic matter that maintains life. Of course, you are correct. By now, you are familiar with the terms defining major nutrients: proteins, carbohydrates, fats and vitamins. You may know a great deal more.

But you are a lot more than your body. Your mind and your spirit are vital aspects of the whole of your being. Expand your concept of food to include much more than the wholesome substances that go into your mouth to feed your body. Your mind needs constant nourishment. Your spirit can be ravenous.

Your body, mind and spirit are fluid and intrinsically interrelated and their “appetites” ebb and flow. Every aspect of you experiences hunger, needs feeding and has its own unique food requirements. It’s up to you to recognize what part of you is hungry and determine the kind of food that will best satisfy that hunger. Keep in mind that if it nourishes your body well, enlivens your mind or expands the reach of your soul, it is food…..

 

Don’t Feed A Starving Spirit Bread

images9TADCVNWSpiritual starvation is often self-inflicted. It has different degrees of severity as can all forms of mal-nourishment. When our spirit is starving, the symptoms are the same as when our mind or body is starving; lethargy, weakness, confusion and irritability. When we are not in touch with our heart to remind us we are enough and have enough, the quality of our lives diminish. Spiritual lethargy clouds over all aspects of our being and we are vulnerable to feelings of emptiness and loss.

A starving spirit can affect our immune system, making our bodies more susceptible to illness. When we cannot access the love in our hearts, we can be very hungry, indeed. Traipsing around, outside our hearts, makes it difficult to retrieve enough of the spiritual resources we need to overcome our most powerful urges to eat that are not biological in nature.

There is no “quick fix” to developing a healthy relationship with food or with yourself. The ultimate solution is a matter of maturity, introspection and spiritual discernment. It is a lifetime endeavor. We learn better ways to take care of ourselves over time. Fortunately, there is enough love and deep appreciation in our heart’s pantry for how we chose to live our life. We have enough courage to get through our physical and emotional problems and our soul’s struggles with feelings of worthlessness, shame, loss and grief—and all the accompanying pain. We find enough wisdom to know the truth and strive for wholeness.

For the spirit….. “Enough is a feast.”     Buddhist Proverb